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How to Create Wow Moments with Mitch Bach

HOW TO CREATE WOW MOMENTS WITH MITCH BACH INTRODUCTION  Today I’m so happy to be talking to Mitch Bach about what makes a great guided experience and how you can create wow moments in your programmes. Mitch is one of those people you meet and instantly get on with. He’s warm, witty and whip-smart. We met in New York a few years ago and have been friends ever since. We share the same passions about making guided experiences interactive, participative, memorable and even, transformative.  Mitch is the co-founder of TripSchool, a

The 4 elements of a great introduction

THE 4 ELEMENTS OF A GREAT INTRODUCTION A good introduction is essential to foster a great group dynamic. An introduction is crucial on any type of programme - whether you’re leading a guided tour, an educational programme, a 15 minute in-gallery conversation or an online session. At this stage, group participants are learning what to do, how the tour or programme is going to operate, what is expected and what is acceptable. It’s your role to give them the orientation they need. And more than that, a good introduction is about about placing connection before content -

How looking at art can improve your mental health with Yaël van Loosbroek – Speck

HOW LOOKING AT ART CAN IMPROVE YOUR MENTAL HEALTH WITH YAËL VAN LOOSBROEK-SPECK INTRODUCTION  This week on the podcast: I’m delighted to be talking to Yaël van Loosbroek-Speck about art and mental health Yaël believes, like me, that everyone can engage with art, and that it all starts with looking - hence the name of her company, ArtSee. About ten years ago Yaël herself suffered from depression and severe anxiety disorder. The only place she could find peace of mind was in front of an artwork. This experience motivated her to create Art as Perspective for people going

6 Ways to Create Awe-Inspiring Experiences with Art and Objects

6 WAYS TO CREATE AWE-INSPIRING EXPERIENCES WITH ART AND OBJECTS INTRODUCTION Awe is an emotion that can be triggered by being around something larger than yourself, that’s not immediately understandable. It's that feeling you get when you look up and see millions of stars in the night sky; witness a beautiful landscape or set eyes on an artwork for the first time. Museums and galleries, historic settings and buildings can all provoke awe. And you can foster more of it in your programmes by thinking carefully about the artworks, objects you include, the questions you ask and

Success-Factors for Leading Discussion-Based Programmes Around Art

SUCCESS-FACTORS FOR LEADING DISCUSSION-BASED PROGRAMMES AROUND ART INTRODUCTION  Today I’m sharing some thoughts about how you can successfully lead engaging discussion-based programmes around art. I’ll be talking briefly about the difference between conversations, discussions and dialogue before moving into 11 tips for successfully creating and leading conversations around art and objects. Don’t forget last week we covered 6 common fears about leading art discussions and I shared some tips on what you can do to overcome these! So do go back and listen to episode 18 as a podcast or read the blog post, if you haven’t already. 

Why you feel scared of leading art discussions (and what to do about it)

Leading tours and educational programmes that are based on discussion, inquiry and interaction can be a scary business. Both for you and for your participants. And if you're about to take your first steps, it might seem really daunting. However, do remember that any concerns you have are perfectly normal and you’re not alone (we’ve all been there and had to start somewhere). Take it one step at a time and with time, practice and guidance, it will get easier (I promise!). In this post, I’ve summarised the most common fears and concerns about leading discussion-based programmes that I’ve heard

What is Visible Thinking – The Essential Guide

What is Visible Thinking (VT)? Read our essential guide and how VT can be applied within museums and heritage sites using our method 'Visible Thinking in the Museum' to facilitate meaningful experiences with art and museum objects. The Basics Visible Thinking has been developed over a number of years by researchers from Harvard's Project Zero with teachers and students. Visible Thinking is essentially a ‘broad and flexible framework for enriching learning’ by fostering deep thinking and a better understanding of content.  Central Idea The central idea of Visible Thinking is simple: making thinking visible. The vast majority of what we

Tips & Tools: Simple Tips for Looking After your Voice

Simple Tips for Looking After your Voice On a guided tour your voice is your instrument, your tool. Like an actor who can produce many different ‘voices’, we can also learn ways to produce sound to increase emphasis, enhance storytelling and add emotional effect. Without your voice, you cannot work, so it makes sense to use your voice wisely (without the aid of whisper sets etc). However, we all know that there are times when we are forced to strain our voices for a large group, or lead too many tours in a row or work in very noisy, echoey

Best Practices for Sharing Information on Guided Tours

By Claire Bown How & when should we share information on guided tours? How can we do this productively and strategically? In this week's post I share best practices for sharing your information and content on tour. Plus I share some extra tips on how to think about handling information in a different way.  Many of us are experts in our field and want to share that incredible knowledge with the groups we lead. However, as I said last week, we need to think about how we can use the information and knowledge we have in a more productive and strategic

Tips & Tools: Positioning on Guided Tours

How often do you think about how you position yourself on a guided tour? And how you position the group too? It can make all the difference! YOU: Before introducing an object/artwork to someone on your tour, see it properly for yourself. Look at it from a variety of difficult angles (as your participants would) and see what is easy or tricky to see from each position. Find the best spot to position your group so that they can all see well (and hear you too!). Literally, you should stand in a good position to reduce the strain on your body