info@thinkingmuseum.com

Success-Factors for Leading Discussion-Based Programmes Around Art

SUCCESS-FACTORS FOR LEADING DISCUSSION-BASED PROGRAMMES AROUND ART INTRODUCTION  Today I’m sharing some thoughts about how you can successfully lead engaging discussion-based programmes around art. I’ll be talking briefly about the difference between conversations, discussions and dialogue before moving into 11 tips for successfully creating and leading conversations around art and objects. Don’t forget last week we covered 6 common fears about leading art discussions and I shared some tips on what you can do to overcome these! So do go back and listen to episode 18 as a podcast or read the blog post, if you haven’t already. 

What is Visible Thinking – The Essential Guide

What is Visible Thinking (VT)? Read our essential guide and how VT can be applied within museums and heritage sites using our method 'Visible Thinking in the Museum' to facilitate meaningful experiences with art and museum objects. The Basics Visible Thinking has been developed over a number of years by researchers from Harvard's Project Zero with teachers and students. Visible Thinking is essentially a ‘broad and flexible framework for enriching learning’ by fostering deep thinking and a better understanding of content.  Central Idea The central idea of Visible Thinking is simple: making thinking visible. The vast majority of what we

Tips & Tools: Simple Tips for Looking After your Voice

Simple Tips for Looking After your Voice On a guided tour your voice is your instrument, your tool. Like an actor who can produce many different ‘voices’, we can also learn ways to produce sound to increase emphasis, enhance storytelling and add emotional effect. Without your voice, you cannot work, so it makes sense to use your voice wisely (without the aid of whisper sets etc). However, we all know that there are times when we are forced to strain our voices for a large group, or lead too many tours in a row or work in very noisy, echoey environments.

Best Practices for Sharing Information on Guided Tours

By Claire Bown How & when should we share information on guided tours? How can we do this productively and strategically? In this week's post I share best practices for sharing your information and content on tour. Plus I share some extra tips on how to think about handling information in a different way.  Many of us are experts in our field and want to share that incredible knowledge with the groups we lead. However, as I said last week, we need to think about how we can use the information and knowledge we have in a more productive and strategic

Tips & Tools: Positioning on Guided Tours

How often do you think about how you position yourself on a guided tour? And how you position the group too? It can make all the difference! YOU: Before introducing an object/artwork to someone on your tour, see it properly for yourself. Look at it from a variety of difficult angles (as your participants would) and see what is easy or tricky to see from each position. Find the best spot to position your group so that they can all see well (and hear you too!). Literally, you should stand in a good position to reduce the strain on your body

Quick Guide to Stress-Free Museum Visits with your Kids

How can you make museum-visiting with kids a stress-free experience? Here's my quick guide to stress-free museum visits with kids - perfect for the school holidays! Museums can seem quite daunting places for families when you are unfamiliar with them. So, before you visit, do some planning to get the most out of your visit: 1. Do your research. In order to make your visit as stress-free an experience as possible, do spend a bit of time choosing your museum and doing your research. Ask your children where they want to go. Look online to check transport links, admission prices,

Tips & Tools: Sensory Experiences on Guided Tours

On a guided tour, using an approach that appeals to all or some of the senses will help you to make your tour experiences more memorable and engaging. It will also help you to communicate your ideas more effectively. In this week's Tips and Tools we're looking at ways to make your tour a more sensory experience. When we travel to a new city or enter a museum for the first time, our senses go into overdrive. We're excited by so many new things to see, hear, smell and do. A guided tour helps participants to focus this sensory overload by

Tips & Tools: Using Notebooks on Guided Tours

In praise of the humble notebook... I have hundreds of tips and tools in my head that I could share with you, but today I've decided to share my go-to and most simple tool - the humble notebook. A notebook, you say? But that's not very exciting... Well, when my three children were small, we used to go off to museums, galleries and places like the zoo armed with a small notebook and a pencil. I just told them that whenever they saw something they liked, they should make a note of it however they wanted - either with a drawing

Visible Thinking Routine of the Week: Beginning-Middle-End

⭐️VISIBLE THINKING ROUTINE OF THE WEEK ⭐️ BEGINNING-MIDDLE-END I absolutely love this routine. It has always been a STAR ⭐️ for me with groups of all ages. It never fails. Even with a group of IT Managers who admitted right at the start of our workshop that they 'don't do art museums' loved this routine and came up with some very imaginative storylines for some Jeff Wall photographs! BEGINNING-MIDDLE-END is our 5th VTR of the week and this one is the last thinking routine that we cover on our DAY 1 Introduction to VT in the Museum training (others are,

Visible Thinking Routine of the Week: Headlines

⭐️VISIBLE THINKING ROUTINE OF THE WEEK ⭐️ HEADLINES This weeks VTR of the week is HEADLINES. This routine helps capture the essence or heart of an idea being discussed. It is also used for summarising and synthesising ideas. Composed of just ONE question that asks: 'If you were to write a headline for this topic or issue right now that captured the most important aspect that should be remembered, what would that headline be?' This routine works well at the end of a discussion and in combination with other routines (such as 10x2+Step Inside + Headlines). It's a good way of rounding