info@thinkingmuseum.com

How to Engage your Audience with Colour in Art Discussions

 HOW TO ENGAGE YOUR AUDIENCE WITH COLOUR IN ART DISCUSSIONS INTRODUCTION Today I’m focusing on colour. Colour is one of the 7 elements of art along with shape, line, form, texture, value and space. It's a vast subject - but today I don't want to focus on colour theory or the science of colour. Instead, I want to get you thinking about how you approach colour with your audience during an art discussion. I’m going to look at different ways you can create discussion about colour with your groups to get them engaged in artworks. Colour is

10 Easy Ways to Make your Guided Tours More Interactive

10 EASY WAYS TO MAKE YOUR GUIDED TOURS MORE INTERACTIVE INTRODUCTION The traditional lecture-style guided tour is dead, long live the interactive tour! Well, it’s not actually, it’s still alive and kicking in some quarters but in my opinion it shouldn’t be.  Traditional lecture-style ‘walk and talk ‘ guided tours with an expert guide are still fairly common and in some places are still a standard way of ‘presenting’ an historic site, a city or a museum to the public. Things have definitely changed in the last 10 years since I started this journey of teaching others

Keep Wondering, Stay Curious

As we get older, we ask fewer questions. We wonder less. I’ve seen this in the past with groups in museums. The primary school children are full of questions and ideas. By secondary school, you have to work so much harder to pique their curiosity. And with adults, it’s a very similar story. They have basically stopped asking questions. We pester our parents with ‘Why?’ and ‘What if’ questions for the first few years of our lives as we try to understand how things work. We’re busy learning. We hit our questioning peak around 4 or 5. Preschool children, on

What is Visible Thinking – The Essential Guide

What is Visible Thinking (VT)? Read our essential guide and how VT can be applied within museums and heritage sites using our method 'Visible Thinking in the Museum' to facilitate meaningful experiences with art and museum objects. The Basics Visible Thinking has been developed over a number of years by researchers from Harvard's Project Zero with teachers and students. Visible Thinking is essentially a ‘broad and flexible framework for enriching learning’ by fostering deep thinking and a better understanding of content.  Central Idea The central idea of Visible Thinking is simple: making thinking visible. The vast majority of what we

Tips & Tools: Simple Tips for Looking After your Voice

Simple Tips for Looking After your Voice On a guided tour your voice is your instrument, your tool. Like an actor who can produce many different ‘voices’, we can also learn ways to produce sound to increase emphasis, enhance storytelling and add emotional effect. Without your voice, you cannot work, so it makes sense to use your voice wisely (without the aid of whisper sets etc). However, we all know that there are times when we are forced to strain our voices for a large group, or lead too many tours in a row or work in very noisy, echoey environments.

Tips & Tools: 7 Tips to Get Over a ‘Tumbleweed Moment’

Have you asked a question to the participants on your tour and no one responds? You look around and all you can see are blank faces. You wait a little longer and still nothing happens. Just the sound of tumbleweed rustling by.... Awkward. Yes, that's the 'tumbleweed moment'; a period of 'dead air or stony, unresponsive silence'. Silence is scary because you don't know what people are thinking. It could mean anything. BUT the good news is that it happens to us all and it's relatively easy to fix. Here are my 7 tips to get over a tumbleweed moment.

Best Practices for Sharing Information on Guided Tours

By Claire Bown How & when should we share information on guided tours? How can we do this productively and strategically? In this week's post I share best practices for sharing your information and content on tour. Plus I share some extra tips on how to think about handling information in a different way.  Many of us are experts in our field and want to share that incredible knowledge with the groups we lead. However, as I said last week, we need to think about how we can use the information and knowledge we have in a more productive and strategic

Tips & Tools: Positioning on Guided Tours

How often do you think about how you position yourself on a guided tour? And how you position the group too? It can make all the difference! YOU: Before introducing an object/artwork to someone on your tour, see it properly for yourself. Look at it from a variety of difficult angles (as your participants would) and see what is easy or tricky to see from each position. Find the best spot to position your group so that they can all see well (and hear you too!). Literally, you should stand in a good position to reduce the strain on your body

Information Overload: How Much is too Much on a Guided Tour?

by Claire Bown How much information is too much on a guided tour? When does information become a burden and how much do we actually remember afterwards? Traditional lecture-style 'walk and talk ' guided tours with an expert guide are still all-to-common and a standard way of 'presenting' an historic site, a city or a museum to the public. However, participants on these style of tours will remember very little of the information they are told, less than 5% in fact. They will become exhausted (and sometimes irritated) by the non-stop flow of information. They will leave their tour none

Quick Guide to Stress-Free Museum Visits with your Kids

How can you make museum-visiting with kids a stress-free experience? Here's my quick guide to stress-free museum visits with kids - perfect for the school holidays! Museums can seem quite daunting places for families when you are unfamiliar with them. So, before you visit, do some planning to get the most out of your visit: 1. Do your research. In order to make your visit as stress-free an experience as possible, do spend a bit of time choosing your museum and doing your research. Ask your children where they want to go. Look online to check transport links, admission prices,