info@thinkingmuseum.com

6 Best Practices for Sharing Information

6 BEST PRACTICES FOR SHARING INFORMATION IN YOUR ART DISCUSSIONS SUMMARY Many of us are experts in our field - possibly art historians, historians or archaeologists - and want to share that incredible knowledge with the groups we lead in our programmes. But knowing what information to share, how to share it and when to share it is often tricky – especially on interactive, discussion-based programmes. And what happens when you add too much information? And how much is too much? Sharing information that is engaging and memorable (without overloading your participants) is a great skill to master.

Best Practices for Sharing Information on Guided Tours

By Claire Bown How & when should we share information on guided tours? How can we do this productively and strategically? In this week's post I share best practices for sharing your information and content on tour. Plus I share some extra tips on how to think about handling information in a different way.  Many of us are experts in our field and want to share that incredible knowledge with the groups we lead. However, as I said last week, we need to think about how we can use the information and knowledge we have in a more productive and strategic

Information Overload: How Much is too Much on a Guided Tour?

by Claire BownHow much information is too much on a guided tour? When does information become a burden and how much do we actually remember afterwards?Traditional lecture-style 'walk and talk ' guided tours with an expert guide are still all-to-common and a standard way of 'presenting' an historic site, a city or a museum to the public.However, participants on these style of tours will remember very little of the information they are told, less than 5% in fact. They will become exhausted (and sometimes irritated) by the non-stop flow of information. They will leave their tour none the richer or wiser