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The Role of Museums in an Evolving World

A Reflection on the 'Museums, Citizenship and Belonging in a Changing Europe' Conference by Danielle Carter 29 November 2016 The 'Museums, Citizenship and Belonging in a Changing Europe' Conference took place at the Museum Volkenkunde in Leiden as part of a larger effort supported by Sharing a World of Inclusion, Creativity and Heritage (SWICH) and the Research Center for Material Culture (RCMC). This is one of a string of conferences this year (see our recent posts on the Inclusive Museum Conference and the Reinwardt Academy Symposium) that has focused on the ethical responsibility of museums when faced with a world in

Impressions of Landscape: Daubigny, Monet, and Van Gogh at the Van Gogh Museum

by Danielle Carter Van Gogh is largely known for still life paintings such as Sunflowers or small landscape paintings created from the view from his window such as Starry Night; however, Van Gogh felt most at peace when he was in nature, and many of his paintings depict rural landscapes. After living with his brother in Paris for about two years (1886-1888), Van Gogh escaped to the more rural town of Arles, positioned in the south of France. This is where he painted many of his most acclaimed paintings. He was more inspired by the landscape and environment of southern France than

Portrait Gallery of the Golden Age: What Not to Miss

The Portrait Gallery of the Golden Age: What Not to Miss by Danielle Carter featured image: Rembrandt (1606 - 1669)  The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Deijman, 1656 If you can’t get enough of Dutch Golden Age art at the Rijksmuseum, the Hermitage Amsterdam is a wonderful additional option to expand your knowledge with the exhibition: Portrait Gallery of the Golden Age. image: Elvert Ezinga From late 2014 through to the end of this year, the Hermitage Amsterdam, in collaboration with the Rijksmuseum and the Amsterdam Museum, is hosting an array of portraits from the Dutch Golden Age, including some of the

The Lucas van Leyden Altarpiece in the Rijksmuseum

Danielle Carter Images courtesy of Olivier Middendorp Presentation in the Gallery of Honour at the Rijksmuseum is taken very seriously.  Only the most famous of Dutch artists are displayed here, often with their names adorning the arches and capitals of the hall when the museum was built in 1885, and again during its subsequent renovation from 2003 to 2013. Thus, each time a new piece is hosted in the Gallery of Honour, it is a notable event. This year alone, Anish Kapoor’s works were hosted in the Gallery of Honour, opposite Rembrandt’s The Jewish Bride and The Syndics; and a newly acquired

Reflections on the Inclusive Museums Conference

Reflections on the Inclusive Museum Conference by Danielle Carter The Inclusive Museum Conference was held this month from the 16th to the 19th of September at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. The inaugural conference was held at the Museum Volkenkunde in Leiden, the Netherlands in 2008 prompted by the assassination of Theo van Gogh in 2004 and the controversy that followed. Van Gogh’s killer, a Dutch-Moroccan purportedly associated with a Dutch terrorist group called the Hofstad Network, attached a note to Theo van Gogh’s body that critiqued many Dutch politicians and their Jewish associates. This prejudice sparked a